Tag Archives: Horror

Top 10 Creative Weapons In Horror

Freddy has his glove, Jason has his Machete and Michael has his knife but sometimes when you just have to get creative especially when there’s oversexed drunk teens to dispatch. So here’s our list of some of the most creative weapon choices in horror history.

Lolipop – The Banana Splits

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While this attempt to give the cult children’s TV favourite a Five Nights At Freddy’s twist might not have set the world on fire but it did give us atleast some memorable deaths which when you consider are essentially being carried out by mascot like characters deserves the film a place on the list alone but this death by lolipop which kicks off their murderous rampage is especially memorable.

Basketball – Deadly Friend

Sure when it comes to exploding heads David Cronenberg’s Scanners might be the first one which comes to mind while no doubt one of the most paused moments in movie history. Of course this much overlooked feature from horror maestro Wes Craven also features another of cinema’s great exploding heads courtesy of a basketball launched with the force of a cannonball by the recently revived girl next door (Kristy Swanson) into the head of the grouch next door (Anne Ramsey)

Yard Stick – Child’s Play 2

Everyone’s favourite serial killer turned killer doll Chucky made a memorable return in this sequel which only built on the fun established by the original film but this time he really pulled out some memorable kills which help make it the best film of the franchise including beating a teacher to death with a yard stick in a scene which is actually surprisingly disturbing to watch especially as most of the action is shown off screen with only the glimpses of the ruler rising and falling past the window and Chucky’s maniacal cackling to leave audience on edge.

Steamroller – Maximum Overdrive

Okay this might be kind of a cheat seeing how it’s a possessed steamroller and hence killing using itself but in a film featuring a killer coke machine killing a baseball coach by shooting cans at his head, a truck with a green goblin faceplate and a healthy dose of AC/DC on the soundtrack as part of a deal Stephen King made when he agreed to direct the film which to date remains his sole directing credit.

While the film might not be fantastic, the scene were a steamroller mows down the unsuspecting kid really is in that warped humour kinda way. Two years later we would get a repeat of this scene when Christopher Lloyd’s demented Judge Doom in Who Framed Roger Rabbit and his subsequent revival ensured that our childhood’s got a healthy dose of Disney funded childhood trauma.

Lawnmower – Brain Dead aka Dead Alive

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The chainsaw has for years been a mainstay of horror cinema putting in memorable appearences for slasher and hero alike from the classic Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Evil Dead through to providing a standout moment in the underwelming (for those who read the book first) adaptation of American Psycho. However Peter Jackson having already put chainsaw’s to creative use in his gore soaked debut Bad Taste really upped the ante by having bumbling hero clear the zombie horde out of his house using a petrol driven mower in the gore soaked finale. So effective was Jackson’s film that Shawn of the Dead creators Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright openly stated that they couldn’t use any body part humour in the film because Jackson’s film had done it all!

Hook – I Know What You Did Last Summer

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Riding on the success of Scream rebooting modern horror this slasher attempted to introduce it’s own slasher icon with the hook welding fisherman looking to get revenge on the teens who accidently ran him over and left him for dead.

Losing his hand at the end of the first film the hook would be turned into a captain hook style apendage for the forgettable and ohh so imaginativly titled sequels I Still Know What You Did Last Summer and I’ll Always Know What You Did Last Summer

Bear Mascot Costume – Girl’s Nite Out aka The Scaremaker

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If your going to be an iconic slasher you need a memorable look with a mask often being the go to choice from the hockey mask for Jason, the Shatner mask for Michael or that weird Owl head the killer in Stagefright wore. Still why settle for a mask when you can wear the whole costume!!

Certainly this is the mindset for the killer of this overlooked slasher whose killer chooses to stalk college cheerleaders while they engage on a scavanger hunt on their campus wearing possibly the goofiest looking bear suit ever while using serrated knife blades for claws to memorable effect if far from the scariest outfit especially with that goofy grimace.

Pick axe – My Bloody Valentine

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Perhaps not the most surprising weapon considering that the killer here is a mining gear clad killer looking to take revenge on the town were the supervisors at the local mine skipped out to a valentine’s day dance instead of checking the methane levels leading to an explosion that trapped many of the miners leaving the sole survivor insane after he was forced to resort to cannibalism to survive.

Here the killer really makes really good use of his pick axe creating some bloody kills as memorable as his getup while the suprisingly decent 3D remake saw the creativity only being added to as it made the most of it’s 3D hook.

Trombone – The Town That Dreaded Sundown

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Another cult favourite here the film based on the Texarkana Moonlight Murders of 1946 which saw an unidentifed masked serial killer known as the Phantom Killer who seems to have borrowed Jason’s sack from Friday the 13th Part 2 aswell as his ability to turn anything into a potential weapon including memorably a party horn to the eye as seen in Part 7: The New Blood.

The standout moment of this film though comes when the phantom straps a knife to the end of a trombone and proceeds to stab his victim while playing the instrumentment to memorable effect.

Shears – The Burning

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Based on the New York legend of the Cropsey Maniac which would also serve as the inspiration for the rather dull Madman released a year later. Here though the crazed former caretaker returns to take revenge on the summer camp were five years previous he was set on fire when a prank went horribly astray.

Here his weapon of choice is a pair of garden shears which are certainly effectivly used throughout the film including a standout raft attack which saw the film being banned under the Video Nasties act under the 1984 Video Recordings Act before finally being released uncut in 2002. Even with the film now finally released uncut it still has the stigma of marking the start of Harvy Weinstein’s history of predatory behavior who served as one of the films script writers.

Scandals aside the film remains a cult favourite for slasher fans with the use of the shears certainly creating some memorable kills in horror history.

So there’s our list but what is your favourite creative weapon choices? Let us know in the comments section.

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Friday Film Club – Anna and the Apocalypse + Rollercoaster

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Hi folks and welcome to the The Friday Film Club where both myself and Kim will be highlighting a film which we feel is worth checking out. At the same time we would love to hear your own selections whether your choosing to just name them in the comments section or join us in arguing the case for your film on your blog, let us know and we will share it below.

Elwood’s Pick – Rollercoaster (1977)

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A film probably best known for its rather spectacular opening roller coaster crash than the film the footage was actually taken from this would be one of the few feature films that James Goldstone directed spending most of his career directing TV Pilots for Ironside and the original Star Trek were his work was not only noted for its momentum but also the “fifteen-minute cliffhangers” he brought to them. This is a film equally noteworthy for being one of the four films which Universal presented in “Sensurround” were selected theatres were low-frequency bass speakers were used to create vibrations at key moments, which ultimately proved to be so successful that it cracked the plaster of some of the theatres which choose to use it.

Despite the impressive opening crash this is surprisingly a much more subtle film than you might expect as Goldstone instead here chooses to craft a tense thriller with the rest of the film plays off the tension of not knowing were the bomber has hidden his next device let alone the mind games between Timothy Bottoms unnamed bomber and George Segal’s Safety inspector Harry. Bottoms however was criticised for being too boring as a villain in reviews for the film when it was originally released but here he gives a performance reminisant of Kevin Spacey’s John Doe in Seven which here really works for the film, especially when he is spending the majority of the film taunting Harry over the phone or a walkie talkie, all the time knowing that he holds the power in this situation with Harry left to play the unwilling puppet in the proceedings.

Segal meanwhile is an engaging leading man as the frustrated safety inspector he works in humorous subtle digs at his incompitant bosses while also having to work with the local police chief and Richard Widmark’s tough FBI agent. While it might seem that his talents are perhaps alittle wasted here seeing how he spends most of the film talking to the Bomber over the walkie talkie while moving through a variety of amusement rides which for theme park fans provides its own enjoyment with the film being shot on location at Ocean View Park, Kings Dominion and Six Flags.

The Cinematography throughout is extremely impressive especially with the rollercoaster footage were large portions are shot from the front of the carriage creating that simulator feel of being on the ride which is a nice touch especially when Goldstone isn’t planning on giving the audience any more crashes. The fact that they are shot from so many angles including some impressive profile shots is really add to the excitement, especially during the finale were the cat and mouse games are played out on the opening of the six flags Revolution the world’s first coaster to use a clothoid-shaped vertical loop and more fun against the backdrop of a Sparks concert a gig which had rumoured to had been offered to both the Bay City Rollers and KISS the later turning it down in favour of doing KISS Meet The Phantom of the Park. Sparks would later recall doing the film as one of the worst things they have ever done which I had to wonder if this was before or after they did their 2006’s album Hello Young Lovers. Despite what they feel about it, the high energy performance here really play well against the tension of this final game between the bomber and police.

While it might initially be a little disappointing to see what seems to be setup as another disaster movie dissolve into a thriller it ultimately proves to be the right move here, especially with Segal’s performance certainly able to carry the film so that such shocks are never required even though the film had originally been planned to be a lot more gruesome with both the opening crash and how the bomber ultimately meets his demise, a plaque for which can still be found on the rollercoaster at Six Flags. While perhaps not a film that rewards repeat viewing it’s one still worth checking out especially for the opening crash as you wonder just how they pulled it off.

Kim’s Pick – Anna and the Apocalypse (2017)

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Mixing genres is a lot of fun and nothing quite sells like the idea of mashing zombies, musical and a Christmas setting together and its one of the reasons that 2017’s Scottish film Anna and the Apocalypse first landed on anyone’s radar during its festival circuit. While the idea sounds a bit odd, just like Shaun of the Dead worked out, Anna and the Apocalypse is very much a teen horror comedy musical. Its not very scary but does offer a lot of alternate Christmas and zombies elements.

Starring a fairly unknown young cast, Anna and the Apocalypse works because it does what it needs well. The first is the musical numbers. The music itself is a lot of fun, probably more for people who like musicals but there’s a lot of entertaining moments in the songs and the background. There are some downright ridiculous moments and yet because it’s a musical, it does work. Second, the friendship element and character bonding here also delivers. The characters really are known more through how they react and are and gives space for them to grow. Third, the pacing and execution is pretty fast-paced because of its compact run time that gives time for things to just keep happening and not spend a lot of time on the dramatic things like dwelling on past issues.

Overall, Anna and the Apocalypse is a movie suitable for Halloween and Christmas and is surprising entertaining with some very addictive songs and fun numbers. The characters are few but all are quite endearing especially with their different personalities. Its rare that the “bad boy” Nick, played by Ben Wiggins is not repulsive but while he starts that way, he also has quite a nice presence here along with main lead Anna, played by Ella Hunt (who suitably is now part of the Apple TV show Dickinson) as well as the fairly awkward presence of their friend, Steph, played by Sarah Swire, who is really witty and a great character in the film as a whole. Catchy tunes, fun characters and zombie apocalypse breakout during Christmas is a really great mashup that’s well worth a watch.

So you’ve seen our picks for this week’s double feature but what are your movie watching plans this weekend?

Let us know in the comments section below.

Friday Film Club – Antisocial + Perfect Blue

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Hi folks and welcome to another edition of The Friday Film Club where both myself and Kim will be highlighting a film which we feel is worth checking out. At the same time we would love to hear your own selections whether your choosing to just name them in the comments section or join us in arguing the case for your film on your blog, let us know and we will share it below.

Kim’s Pick – Antisocial (2013)

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Canadian film company Black Fawn Films is known for its filmography of independent horror films. With a good number of films under their belt, there is no doubt that the team themselves have a great love for horror and in their films, a lot of homage is given to the various subgenres of horror. However, what gives them a unique twist is not only their vision of creating something new of their own while also mixing it up in terms of various subgenres together. While some viewers might view this as “been there done that” and feeling very familiar with its content, especially with the film today, it’s still has some refreshing elements especially paired up how the films are usually executed.

Antisocial is a 2013 horror film set during New Year’s Eve focused on a house with five university students partying it up when an epidemic spreads throughout the world. As they barricade themselves in the house, they also start rummaging around the Internet to find out the cause of the epidemic. Slowly, they each become both scared and filled with paranoia. Taking a bit of the digital world epidemic like Pulse and blending it into a science fiction-esque story and then adding in some zombie elements here, this film is a nicely-paced movie. Its mystery of the epidemic unravels itself. At the same time, while the 5 characters here might not be fully investigated, making them slightly more shallow, the film never forgets its focus is not on all the character drama but rather on the urgent situation at hand. There are some truly tense moments and they do ramp up to a memorable climax. Antisocial is not perfect but its straight forward and not always predictable.

It’s a revisit on our part that has held up a lot of its initial appeal. And if this film is your cup of tea, Antisocial 2 did also happen. While its pacing is different from the first one, its story is set some time after Antisocial ends.

Elwood’s Pick – Perfect Blue (1997)

MoxieStaffPicksPerfectBlueSatoshi Kon’s directorial debut is Hitchcock-esq thriller following Mima , a member of a J-pop group “CHAM!” decides to pursue a career as an actress, displeasing her fans especially her stalker Me-Mania (Okura). Now finding herself the target of threatening fax’s and mail bombs, things only get stranger when she discovers a website call “Mima’s Room” documenting her life if she was still with the band, as Mima finds her world being turned upside down as she is pushed to the brink of her own sanity.

A griping film throughout, the film though is a lot deeper than your usual psychological thriller, as while most thrillers would be content to just play off the mystery of “Mima’s Room”, here Kon’s focus on the changing personality from Virginal pop idol to driven actress willing to do more and more to ensure that she makes it as an actress, even if it means shattering the image her fans about her as she inturn starts to slowly reveal her much darker side.

 

At the same time Kon shows equal attention to the supporting characters who all provide their own piece of the puzzle, from Mima’s office Manger Tadokoro (Tsuji) who pushes Mima into increasingly risque situations which he convinces is for the good of her career regardless of the pressure it puts on her already fragile psyche through to the obsessed  and grotesque stalker Me-Mania who plasters his walls with images of Mima’s pop idol form which in one memorable scene even speak to him. Kon though is equally mindful of the smaller details which often prove as a result to be just as memorable, such as an actor involved in filming the rape scene apologising to Mima during a break between takes.

The animation is crisp and clean throughout, with Kon choosing to avoid the more traditional large eyed anime style, instead for a more realistic style as seen with the wide range of character designs and while it might not have the wow factor that many have come to expect thanks to the releases of Studio Ghibli this is still visually a nice anime to look at, with the movement of the characters being especially spot on as especially highlighted during the ice pick murder sequence involving a length chase around the victims apartment.

A benchmark in Japanese animation aswell as also providing the inspiration for Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan, as it’s slowly earned the same recognition as the likes of the legendry Akira or Ghost In The Shell.

So you’ve seen our picks for this week’s double feature but what are your movie watching plans this weekend?

Let us know in the comments section below.

Friday Film Club – Balto + Kitten With A Whip

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Hi folks and welcome to the The Friday Film Club where both myself and Kim will be highlighting a film which we feel is worth checking out. At the same time we would love to hear your own selections whether your choosing to just name them in the comments section or join us in arguing the case for your film on your blog, let us know and we will share it below.

Kim’s Pick – Balto (1995)

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Loosely based on the true story of a dog of the same name who helped save children in Alaska, Balto has some live action scenes in Central Park of an elderly woman recounting his story and what makes Balto a hero. Most of the movie aside from the beginning and ending is animated filled with not only a group of sled dogs in Alaska but also with a Russian goose called Boris and polar bear brothers Muk and Luk who are terrified of water and of course, Balto who is an outcast and expected to be dangerous because he is half Husky and half wolf. An unexpected grouping but an effectively funny one that gives it the cute and fun adventure with a bit of drama.

Balto is a family adventure animated film. At the same time, it has those added elements of romance between Balto and Jenna where Jenna’s affection is trying to be won over by the top dog called Steele who doesn’t want to admit defeat when he fails at bringing home the medicine to save the children in Nome during the storm. It is a story of triumph, danger, friendship and romance. At the same time, Balto is a character that has to learn to embrace his own differences and use those differences as what helps him to succeed in this journey. Its an inspiring little animated film.

Voiced by some great talent like Kevin Bacon as Balto, Bridget Fonda as Jenna, Bob Hoskins as Steele and Jim Cummings as both Muk and Luk, there’s a lot to love about this film as they bring on some great fun times and totally one that didn’t get its recognition as its release collided with the much more successful Toy Story but that doesn’t stop the greatness that this animated film deserves.

Elwood’s Pick – Kitten With A Whip (1964)

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Despite the S&M title this home invasion thriller is alot less sleazy than the title would have you believe as Ann-Margaret in an attempt to rebrand herself as a serious actor stars as the young runaway Jody who breaks into the house of upcoming politician David (John Forsythe) while his wife is out of town. Initially he attempts to help the young girl as he buys her new clothes and puts her on the bus with money to help her out. Unfortunately for David she just turns up at his house again not only refusing to leave but also bringing with her a group of beatniks who only further throw David’s life into chaos.

For fans of MST3K this might already be a familiar title seeing how it received their peanut gallery treatment but enjoyed in its original form this is actually a pretty effective thriller especially during its first half with David trying to be the good person while Jody soon is revealed to be hiding more than her share of dark secrets and soon is threatening to damage David’s political aspirations by twisting the reality of their situation.

While the first half of the film is fantastic thanks to the strong chemistry between the two leads which is a little lost once Jody’s friends turn up including amatuer philosepher Ron (Peter Brown) and quick to anger Grant (Richard Anderson) and turn the situation from mind games to more physical threats all while you wonder if Beatniks are worse than Hippies as certainly Ron and his musing certainly make you wonder who buys into this tosh. Thankfully you the unclear allegiance of Jody keeps things interesting as your never sure if she trying to help David or if it’s another of her mind games. When we get to the finale the film also randomly shifts location to Tijuana in search of a shady doctor though it really seems to be just an excuse to work in some light titillation via a burlesque club which has nothing to do with the plot as we build to a climactic car chase.

Despite being MST3K fodder this is still a fun throw away watch with some fun twists even if it loses its way in the second half it’s brisk runtime and tight pacing means that it doesn’t outstay it’s welcome.

So you’ve seen our picks for this week’s double feature but what are your movie watching plans this weekend?

Let us know in the comments section below.

Friday Film Club – Tigers Are Not Afraid + The Descent: Part 2

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Hi folks and welcome to the The Friday Film Club where each week Kim and myself highlighting a film which we feel is worth checking out. At the same time we would love to hear your own selections whether your choosing to just name them in the comments section or join us in arguing the case for your film on your blog, let us know and we will share it below.

Kim’s Pick – Tigers Are Not Afraid (2017)

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Finally getting a theatrical release on the big screen after two years going through film festivals and earning praise from both Guillermo del Toro and Stephen King, Tigers Are Not Afraid is a Mexican fairytale, most often compared to Pan’s Labyrinth with similar tones set in an upsetting reality of the drug wars in Mexico with five orphaned children grouped together to find hope in its dark fairytale of being granted three wishes except all wishes come with its own set of consequences.

Tigers Are Not Afraid pulls together five orphaned children. As we see the main girl Estrella who comes home from school to find her mother is missing, she escapes to the street to eventually find El Shine, a young boy also surviving on the streets with a few other little boys and joins up with them. Hiding on rooftops and alleyways, they strive to survive day by day until one day Shine steals a cell phone belonging to a member of the drug cartel and discovers its contents. As the thug chases after them, the mystery of what is on the cell phone and  desperate situations making Estrella consider using her wishes despite the outcome of the first one. For their survival, this group of kids have to make tough decisions to stay alive.

Issa Lopez, as both director and screenwriter, shows off both great command behind the camera as well her sharp storytelling skills as she tells this dark fairytale. Choosing children with zero acting experience prior to this film and shooting this film in chronological order without showing them the script to capture their genuine reactions, also gives it an edge as the children all capture both their naivety as children but also what the dangerous reality has caused some of them to grow up quickly. Leading the group is El Shine played by Juan Ramon Lopez and Estrella played by Paola Lara who deserve a lot of credit for their heavier roles. With urban legends of hand-drawn tigers running around the scene and being given three wishes, tigers has their own symbol here and meshes into a beautifully touch but tough to watch story of children caught in the drug wars and fairytales that both give them hope but have some costly consequences.

If you didn’t catch this film during its festival circuits, it is definitely worth it to check it out at theatres or at least keep it on your radar.

Elwood’s Pick – The Descent: Part 2

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The Descent was never a film I particularly warmed to despite many critics rushing to herald Neil Marshall as an exciting new voice in horror, even though the original film was much more effective when it was following it’s all female group of cavers trying to find a way out the cave system than when the horror elements kicked in with the whole experience feeling like a poor rehash of the superior What Waits Below. However when it comes to the sequel directed by editor Jon Harris for what is still his sole directing credit here we have a sequel which surpasses the original.

Set two days after the events of the first film with Sarah (Shauna Macdonald) left traumatised and with no memories of what happened. Now recruited by the local shrieff Vaines (Gavan O’Herlihy) to lead a rescue team back into the cave to find the missing members of her group only to soon find themselves being hunted by the Crawlers whose lair they must once more enter.

Wisely ramping up the action than trying to replicate the first film, this in turn makes for a much more fun ride as the group soon find themselves split up after their first encounter with the crawlers and faced with a battle back to the service with caving equipment once more getting put to some very creative uses thanks to the gore quota being ramped up which in turn lends itself to some memorable moments throughout.

Increasing the cave sets from 18 to 30 means we get to explore the world of the Crawlers a lot more in this film, with Harris giving us subtle clues of how their subterranean society works including were they choose to go to the bathroom as Sarah and Deputy Sheriff Elen (Krysten Cummings) get to unfortunately discover for themselves. Much like the first film these sets look fantastic and hard to distinguish from an actual cave system meaning that the feeling of claustrophobia that the first film really nailed.

If like myself you skipped out on this sequel after the first film, this is a film well worth giving a watch, even if you never saw the original as the plot is easy to pick up especially when the film gives you all you need to know in the opening five minutes so why give yourself another reason to never go caving.

So you’ve seen our picks for this week’s double feature but what are your movie watching plans this weekend?

Let us know in the comments section below.

Round Up

The Blade Licking Thieves #54 – The Guys revisit the anime adapation of the arcade classic Fatal Fury

The Asian Cinema Film Club #31 see’s Elwood and Stephen checking out Sammo Hung’s take on The Dirty Dozen while finding time to tap into his inner Rambo as he joins a host of Hong Kong legends as a group of convict soldiers are sent to Vietnam to destroy a secret Ammo dump.

The Feminine Critique – Emily and Christine check out Karyn Kusama’s 2018 crime thriller Destroyer aswell as social media slashers, the subgenre of ghostiness that began with Insidious, 2010’s infuriating Legion, and a glorious mid-dive into Jason Takes Manhattan and Jason Lives

If your yet to discover The Anime Nostalgia Podcast and are a fan of old school anime host provides a fantastic look back at some classic and forgotten anime titles, while even finding the time to solve the mystery of Miami Mike

Elwood recently got to guest on the Blueprint: Review Podcast along with Jason Soto (of the Maniac With a Machete podcast) to discuss the upcoming home releases aswell as reviews of The Incident and Enter the Anime.

If your yet to check out Kim’s debut on The Lambcast #491 make sure you do now as the roundtable discussion looks at Hobbs and Shaw

After Hours – Love, Death + Robots (Season #1)

Wrapping up season #2 our final bonus episode has us looking at Love, Death + Robots for our first boxset binge.

A project from David Fincher and Tim Miller whose initial plans to
remake Heavy Metal were mophed instead into this anthology of short
animated tales with seemingly limitless scope for the stories which can
be told as we discover from this first season.

So get ready for alternative histories, monsters, shocking twists and of course love, death + robots!!

 

Music on this episode

Keith Mansfield – Funky Fanfare

Listen to the Show

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After Hours #4 – Deep Blue Sea

Welcome to our seasonal “Shark Week” episode as after we had so much fun with “The Meg” last season why not look at a shark movie every season.

On this episode we revisit the 90’s classic Deep Blue Sea as a team of scientists find themselves stuck in a rapidly deteriating underwater facility while surrounded by super inteligent sharks!!

We question what it is about this film which made it such a cult classic, Samuel L. Jackson’s favourite death scene and how much of the film did the sharks actually plan plus much more!!